Calendar

Sep
19
Thu
2019
Dawoud Kringle’s Music Meditation Session @ Quest Bookshop
Sep 19 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Dawoud KringleDawoud Kringle‘s Music Meditation Sessions are a unique experience. It is a guided meditation that replaces suggested imagery with psychoactive musical form. Many people have had profound experiences with this.

Inspired by the vast musical traditions from around the world; east and west, acoustic and electronic, modern and ancient. Dawoud uses these varied genres to provide a creative and sacred inspiration, and illuminate a new musical path.

In addition to being an accomplished guitarist and bassist, it is his work on the sitar and dilruba that have earned his reputation as “The Jimi Hendrix of the sitar.” His experiments with applying jazz technique and electronics to the traditional music and techniques are unprecedented, and seeks to extend the boundaries of the instruments.

Sep
24
Tue
2019
MFM Presents: “Make Music Your Business” #9 Workshop with Ken Hatfield @ Wingspan Arts
Sep 24 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
MFM Presents: “Make Music Your Business” #9 Workshop with Ken Hatfield @ Wingspan Arts

Ken Hatfield Speaking About Copyright – legally protecting your creations. Understanding, securing and defending the most fundamental of all artists’ rights.

Date: Tuesday, September 24th, 2019
Time: 7pm to 8:30pm
Venue:  Wingspan Arts (Film Center Building, 630 9th Ave, between 44 & 45 St., Suite 602, NY, NY 10036)
Ticket: $15 (free for MFM members). No refund.

Seating: limited (up to 25 seats)

“What finally turned me into an activist for artists’ rights was the realization that no musician can afford to sit on the sidelines expecting others to fight for rights we ourselves are unwilling to defend.” Ken Hatfield

MFM Advisory Committee member Ken Hatfield will discuss what copyright is, its origins, its importance and why giant tech corporations are funding Astroturf campaigns to undermine it. He will also cover what individual artists need to do to secure and protect the ownership rights of their music under the recently passed Music Modernization Act (MMA). 

About Ken Hatfield: the musician, author and activist

A leading proponent of jazz played on the classical guitar, composer KEN HATFIELD received ASCAP‘s prestigious Vanguard Award in 2006 for “innovative and distinctive music that is charting new directions in jazz.”

Ken’s the leader on 10 commercially released CDs, 9 featuring him performing his original compositions, as a soloist or with his ensembles. He’s published six books of his compositions. In 2005 Mel Bay published his comprehensive instructional book Jazz and the Classical Guitar: Theory and Application and in 2017 included two of his compositions in Contemporary Guitar Composers of the Americas. 

Ken’s compositional experience ranges from jazz works for his own ensembles, to solo classical guitar works, choral works, and ballet scores for Judith Jamison, The Washington Ballet Company, and the Maurice Béjart Ballet Company, as well as scores for television and film, including Eugene Richards’ award-winning documentary but, the day came.

Ken continues to lead his own ensembles and be an in-demand sideman. In recent years he has also become an artist rights activist, serving as co-chair of the Artist Rights Caucus of Local 802 and as a member of the Advisory Committee of Musicians for Musicians (MFM). In April 2019 he participated in the United States Copyright Office’s fifth and final roundtable on reform of section 512 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 

About MFM

MFM seeks to bring together musicians from all disciplines, styles, traditions and localities in the cause of their mutual self-betterment. Whether through education, networking or political action, MFM’s ultimate goal is to elevate the work of all musicians to the level of a true profession, one which is recognized and appropriately rewarded by the society in which they live and work. MFM additionally advocates for the creation and maintenance of a fair and sustainable musical ecosystem, one in which participants share equitably in all forms of revenue generated by their work product, whether composed, recorded, or performed live. In the final analysis, we seek to promote all conditions which benefit the musicians’ community and the music created by it, while opposing all those which do them harm.”