Tag Archives: Stephen Johnson

Report: MFM ZOOM Webinar #4 w. Richard Miller and Stephen Johnson

The Rhythmic and Harmonic History of Brazilian Music from Choro to Bossa Nova

Report by Dawoud Kringle

On Friday, March 26, 2021, MFM presented its 4th Zoom Webinar. MFM Members Richard Miller and Stephen Johnson presented a discussion on the history of Brazilian music.

MFM ZOOM Webinar #4Guitarist Richard Miller has performed extensively throughout the United States and Latin America in concerts that explore his roots in Brazilian choro, American Jazz, and classical guitar. He has a Ph.D. in music theory from Catholic University of America and a Masters in guitar performance from Manhattan School of Music. He taught music theory and ear training at Columbia University for eight years and has just relocated to Southern California. Lambert Academic Publishing recently published his book The Guitar in the Brazilian Choro.

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MFM PODCAST EPISODE 7: Stephen Johnson Discusses Issues Facing Musicians Today

In this episode of MFM Speaks OutDawoud Kringle interviews guitarist Stephen Johnson; Polydor recording artist formerly of Victorian Parents, and Son of John, and presently with Future350), musical director of the Movita Dance Theater, and the co-founder and head of the MFM Hudson Valley Chapter.

Some of the topics discussed will include the changes in the music scene in Johnson’s native Staffordshire UK, Cork County Ireland, and the US, the changing issues facing musicians today (especially in the pandemic), the need for community and solidarity, and the founding of MFM’s first chapter outside New York City.

The following music featured in this episode is provided courtesy of Stephen Johnson. Continue reading

CD Review: Peter Wetzler’s Solo Piano “Falling Awake”

Peter WetzlerArtist: Peter Wetzler
Title: Falling Awake
Label: Sound Forms
Genre: solo piano/nu classic/improv

CD Review by Dawoud Kringle

When I was asked to write a review of Peter Wetzler’s 2009 CD Falling Awake, I was expecting (for reasons I can’t explain) a classical pianist whose CD contained the usual standards of the genre, and one or two pieces by a living composer. My assumption was wrong, and pleasantly so.

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